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Issued date: 2010-06-02

Publisher version: http:-underthemask.wikidot.com-local-files-papers-2010-Vicente diaz Gandasegui.pdf

Keywords: Videogames , Gamer , Non-gamer

Rights: Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España

Abstract:This article is a sociological analysis of those individuals who are not involved in the gamer’s culture even though they live in a society in which technology has assumed a fundamental relevance in the perception of unreality and the presentation of virtualThis article is a sociological analysis of those individuals who are not involved in the gamer’s culture even though they live in a society in which technology has assumed a fundamental relevance in the perception of unreality and the presentation of virtual worlds. In such a world, the individuals have access to, and the ability to afford the necessary technology, to play videogames on computers, mobile phones or video consoles, deny that possibility and constitute nowadays an increasing minority. I will examine the sociological aspects and psychological characteristics of this group of individuals who share their time with friends and relatives who play videogames. These ‘future minority’ currently live in houses surrounded by technological devices, their work is often influenced by technology, they use transport that is managed by technology, but prefer not to enter virtual worlds in their leisure time; they choose the realities expressed in atoms rather than bits, and in doing so, they reject the opportunity to enter the unlimited possibilities offered by virtuality, avoiding the professional, cultural and educational skills that gamers acquire through the use of videogames. This article also examines the non-gamer from a personal perspective, autoanalysing the researcher as a case study of the non-gamer in today’s western society. I have had to deal with the ambivalent long term professional interest in analysing and researching virtual worlds and videogames whilst simultaneously having a lack of personal interest in playing and accessing the potential offered by technology and virtuality. My professional and personal concerns collide at this point and result in a contradiction that I will explore as a member of the non-gamer social group.+-

Description:Artículo presentado en la conferencia -Under the Mask: Perspectives on the gamer-. University of Bedforshire. 2nd June 2010





Author: Diaz Gandasegui, Vicente

Source: http://e-archivo.uc3m.es


Teaser



Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Repositorio institucional e-Archivo http:--e-archivo.uc3m.es Área de Sociología DAS - SOC - Comunicaciones en Congresos y otros eventos 2010-06-02 The non-gamer Diaz Gandasegui, Vicente http:--hdl.handle.net-10016-11280 Descargado de e-Archivo, repositorio institucional de la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid The non-gamer Vicente Diaz Gandasegui Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Abstract This article is a sociological analysis of those individuals who are not involved in the gamer’s culture even though they live in a society in which technology has assumed a fundamental relevance in the perception of (un)reality and the presentation of virtual worlds.
In such a world, the individuals have access to, and the ability to afford the necessary technology, to play videogames on computers, mobile phones or video consoles, deny that possibility and constitute nowadays an increasing minority.
I will examine the sociological aspects and psychological characteristics of this group of individuals who share their time with friends and relatives who play videogames.
These ‘future minority’ currently live in houses surrounded by technological devices, their work is often influenced by technology, they use transport that is managed by technology, but prefer not to enter virtual worlds in their leisure time; they choose the realities expressed in atoms rather than bits, and in doing so, they reject the opportunity to enter the unlimited possibilities offered by virtuality, avoiding the professional, cultural and educational skills that gamers acquire through the use of videogames. This article also examines the non-gamer from a personal perspective, (auto)analysing the researcher as a case study of the non-gamer in today’s western society.
I have had to deal with the ambivalent long term professional interest in analysing and researching virtual worlds and videogames whilst simultaneously having a lack of personal interest in playing...





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