Angiogenesis is present in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and pro-angiogenic factors are increased in multiple sclerosis lesionsReportar como inadecuado




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Journal of Neuroinflammation

, 7:95

First Online: 22 December 2010Received: 31 August 2010Accepted: 22 December 2010

Abstract

BackgroundAngiogenesis is a common finding in chronic inflammatory diseases; however, its role in multiple sclerosis MS is unclear. Central nervous system lesions from both MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis EAE, the animal model of MS, contain T cells, macrophages and activated glia, which can produce pro-angiogenic factors. Previous EAE studies have demonstrated an increase in blood vessels, but differences between the different phases of disease have not been reported. Therefore we examined angiogenic promoting factors in MS and EAE lesions to determine if there were changes in blood vessel density at different stages of EAE.

MethodsIn this series of experiments we used a combination of vascular casting, VEGF ELISA and immunohistochemistry to examine angiogenesis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis EAE. Using immunohistochemistry we also examined chronic active MS lesions for angiogenic factors.

ResultsVascular casting and histological examination of the spinal cord and brain of rats with EAE demonstrated that the density of patent blood vessels increased in the lumbar spinal cord during the relapse phase of the disease p < 0.05. We found an increased expression of VEGF by inflammatory cells and a decrease in the recently described angiogenesis inhibitor meteorin. Examination of chronic active human MS tissues demonstrated glial expression of VEGF and glial and blood vessel expression of the pro-angiogenic receptor VEGFR2. There was a decreased expression of VEGFR1 in the lesions compared to normal white matter.

ConclusionsThese findings reveal that angiogenesis is intimately involved in the progression of EAE and may have a role in MS.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1742-2094-7-95 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Autor: Timothy J Seabrook - Amanda Littlewood-Evans - Volker Brinkmann - Bernadette Pöllinger - Christian Schnell - Peter C Hies

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/



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