Training tomorrows doctors in diabetes: self-reported confidence levels, practice and perceived training needs of post-graduate trainee doctors in the UK. A multi-centre surveyReportar como inadecuado




Training tomorrows doctors in diabetes: self-reported confidence levels, practice and perceived training needs of post-graduate trainee doctors in the UK. A multi-centre survey - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

BMC Medical Education

, 8:22

First Online: 17 April 2008Received: 14 September 2007Accepted: 17 April 2008

Abstract

ObjectiveTo assess the confidence, practices and perceived training needs in diabetes care of post-graduate trainee doctors in the UK.

MethodsAn anonymised postal questionnaire using a validated -Confidence Rating- CR scale was applied to aspects of diabetes care and administered to junior doctors from three UK hospitals. The frequency of aspects of day-to-day practice was assessed using a five-point scale with narrative description in combination with numeric values. Respondents had a choice of -always- 100% -almost always- 80–99% -often- 50–79% -not very often- 20–49% and -rarely- less than 20%. Yes-No questions were used to assess perception of further training requirements. Additional -free-text- comments were also sought.

Results82 doctors completed the survey. The mean number of years since medical qualification was 3 years and 4 months, range: 4 months to 14 years and 1 month. Only 11 of the respondents had undergone specific diabetes training since qualification.

45% reported -not confident- CR1, 30 37% -satisfactory but lacked confidence- CR2, 25 30% felt -confident in some cases- CR3 and 23 28% doctors felt fully confident CR4 in diagnosing diabetes. 12 15% doctors would always, 24 29% almost always, 20 24% often, 22 27% not very often and 4 5% rarely take the initiative to optimise gcaemic control. 5 6% reported training in diagnosis of diabetes was adequate while 59 72% would welcome more training. Reported confidence was better in managing diabetes emergencies, with 4 5% not confident in managing hypoglycaemia, 10 12% lacking confidence, 22 27% confident in some cases and 45 55% fully confident in almost all cases. Managing diabetic ketoacidosis, 5 6% doctors did not feel confident, 16 20% lacked confidence, 20 24% confident in some cases, and 40 50% felt fully confident in almost all cases.

ConclusionThere is a lack of confidence in managing aspects of diabetes care, including the management of diabetes emergencies, amongst postgraduate trainee doctors with a perceived need for more training. This may have considerable significance and further research is required to identify the causes of deficiencies identified in this study.

AbbreviationsCRConfidence Rating

UKUnited Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Jyothis T George - David A Warriner - Jeffrin Anthony - Kavitha S Rozario - Sinu Xavier - Edward B Jude - Gerard A McK

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







Documentos relacionados