It gives you an understanding you cant get from any book. The relationship between medical students and doctors personal illness experiences and their performance: a qualitative and quantitative studyReportar como inadecuado




It gives you an understanding you cant get from any book. The relationship between medical students and doctors personal illness experiences and their performance: a qualitative and quantitative study - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

BMC Medical Education

, 7:50

First Online: 05 December 2007Received: 06 February 2007Accepted: 05 December 2007

Abstract

BackgroundAnecdotes abound about doctors- personal illness experiences and the effect they have on their empathy and care of patients. We formally investigated the relationship between doctors- and medical students- personal illness experiences, their examination results, preparedness for clinical practice, learning and professional attitudes and behaviour towards patients.

MethodsNewly-qualified UK doctors in 2005 n = 2062-4784, and two cohorts of students at one London medical school n = 640-749 participated in the quantitative arm of the study. 37 Consultants, 1 Specialist Registrar, 2 Clinical Skills Tutors and 25 newly-qualified doctors participated in the qualitative arm. Newly-qualified doctors and medical students reported their personal illness experiences in a questionnaire. Doctors- experiences were correlated with self-reported preparedness for their new clinical jobs. Students- experiences were correlated with their examination results, and self-reported anxiety and depression. Interviews with clinical teachers, newly-qualified doctors and senior doctors qualitatively investigated how personal illness experiences affect learning, professional attitudes, and behaviour.

Results85.5% of newly-qualified doctors and 54.4% of medical students reported personal illness experiences. Newly-qualified doctors who had been ill felt less prepared for starting work p < 0.001, but those who had only experienced illness in a relative or friend felt more prepared p = 0.02. Clinical medical students who had been ill were more anxious p = 0.01 and had lower examination scores p = 0.006. Doctors felt their personal illness experiences helped them empathise and communicate with patients. Medical students with more life experience were perceived as more mature, empathetic, and better learners; but illness at medical school was recognised to impede learning.

ConclusionThe majority of the medical students and newly qualified doctors we studied reported personal illness experiences, and these experiences were associated with lower undergraduate examination results, higher anxiety, and lower preparedness. However reflection on such experiences may have improved professional attitudes such as empathy and compassion for patients. Future research is warranted in this area.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1472-6920-7-50 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Katherine Woolf - Judith Cave - I Chris McManus - Jane E Dacre

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







Documentos relacionados