The Effects of Time Varying Curvature on Species Transport in Coronary ArteriesReportar como inadecuado




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Annals of Biomedical Engineering

, Volume 34, Issue 12, pp 1820–1832

First Online: 19 October 2006Received: 26 September 2005Accepted: 23 August 2006

Abstract

Alterations in mass transport patterns of low-density lipoproteins LDL and oxygen are known to cause atherosclerosis in larger arteries. We hypothesise that the species transport processes in coronary arteries may be affected by their physiological motion, a factor which has not been considered widely in mass transfer studies. Hence, we numerically simulated the mass transport of LDL and oxygen in an idealized moving coronary artery model under both steady and pulsatile flow conditions. A physiological inlet velocity and a sinusoidal curvature waveform were specified as velocity and wall motion boundary conditions. The results predicted elevation of LDL flux, impaired oxygen flux and low wall shear stress WSS along the inner wall of curvature, a predilection site for atherosclerosis. The wall motion induced changes in the velocity and WSS patterns were only secondary to the pulsatile flow effects. The temporal variations in flow and WSS due to the flow pulsation and wall motion did not affect temporal changes in the species wall flux. However, the wall motion did alter the time-averaged oxygen and LDL flux in the order of 26% and 12% respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that the wall motion may play an important role in coronary arterial transport processes and emphasise the need for further investigation.

KeywordsWall motion Coronary artery motion Mass transport CFD Coronary atherosclerosis Wall shear stress LDL transport Oxygen transport  Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Maheshwaran K. Kolandavel - Ernst-Torben Fruend - Steffen Ringgaard - Peter G. Walker

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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