Upper Extremity Motor Learning among Individuals with Parkinsons Disease: A Meta-Analysis Evaluating Movement Time in Simple TasksReport as inadecuate




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Parkinson-s DiseaseVolume 2012 2012, Article ID 589152, 7 pages

Review Article

Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 3K7

Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5C1

Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6G 1H1

Received 15 April 2011; Revised 18 July 2011; Accepted 22 September 2011

Academic Editor: Leland E. Dibble

Copyright © 2012 K. Felix et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Motor learning has been found to occur in the rehabilitation of individuals with Parkinson-s disease PD. Through repetitive structured practice of motor tasks, individuals show improved performance, confirming that motor learning has probably taken place. Although a number of studies have been completed evaluating motor learning in people with PD, the sample sizes were small and the improvements were variable. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the ability of people with PD to learn motor tasks. Studies which measured movement time in upper extremity reaching tasks and met the inclusion criteria were included in the analysis. Results of the meta-analysis indicated that people with PD and neurologically healthy controls both demonstrated motor learning, characterized by a decrease in movement time during upper extremity movements. Movement time improvements were greater in the control group than in individuals with PD. These results support the findings that the practice of upper extremity reaching tasks is beneficial in reducing movement time in persons with PD and has important implications for rehabilitation.





Author: K. Felix, K. Gain, E. Paiva, K. Whitney, M. E. Jenkins, and S. J. Spaulding

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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