Soil fauna abundance and diversity in a secondary semi-evergreen forest in Guadeloupe Lesser Antilles: influence of soil type and dominant tree speciesReportar como inadecuado




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* Corresponding author 1 DYNECAR EA 926 - Dynamique des écosystèmes Caraïbe et biologie des espèces associées 2 UPMC - Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6 3 ECOTROP - Fonctionnement, évolution et mécanismes régulateurs des écosystèmes forestiers

Abstract : The importance of secondary tropical forests regarding the maintenance of soil fauna abundance and diversity is poorly known. The aims of this study were 1 to describe soil fauna abundance and diversity and 2 to assess the determinants of soil fauna abundance and diversity in two stands of a tropical semi-evergreen secondary forest. Soil macrofauna and microarthropod abundance and soil macrofauna diversity were described at two sites developed on different soils and with different site histories: 1 a natural secondary stand natural forest under two dominant tree species, Pisonia subcordata and Bursera simaruba, and 2 a planted secondary forest planted forest under three tree species, B. simaruba, Swietenia macrophylla, and Tabebuia heterophylla. The effects of both soil and main tree species- litter quality were assessed to explain soil fauna abundance and diversity. The abundance of soil macrofauna was significantly higher in the soil under the planted forest, and soil fauna communities were contrasted between the two sites. In the planted forest, a soil-dwelling macrofauna community developed mainly consisting of the anecic earthworm Polypheretima elongata. In the natural forest, soil macrofauna and microarthropod communities were located at the soil surface. The effect of plant litter quality varied according to each dominant tree species and was superimposed to soil effect. The lowest macrofauna abundance was associated with B. simaruba in the natural forest. T. heterophylla supported a much greater macrofauna community than the two other tree species studied at the same soil, and it appears likely that this is due to the palatability of its leaves compared with the other trees low lignin, tannins, soluble phenols.

Keywords : biodiversity litter quality macrofauna microarthropods semi-evergreen forests





Autor: Gladys Loranger-Merciris - Daniel Imbert - France Bernhard-Reversat - Jean-François Ponge - Patrick Lavelle -

Fuente: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/



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