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Journal of Nutrition and MetabolismVolume 2012 2012, Article ID 242875, 8 pages

Research Article

Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Martindale’s Road, St. Michael, Cave Hill, Barbados

School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montred, QC, Canada H3A 0G4

Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica

Received 4 June 2012; Revised 14 September 2012; Accepted 17 September 2012

Academic Editor: Dominique Bouglé

Copyright © 2012 Pamela S. Gaskin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Barbados, a small developing state at the end of the nutrition transition, faces an obesity epidemic. Although there is hope of stemming the epidemic in childhood, no descriptions of children-s dietary and physical activity PA patterns are available for planning purposes. We describe the food and activity preferences and adult encouragement of active and sedentary behaviors for children 9–11 years in relation to weight status and the cultural context. Design. We used data from a pilot study preceding a large-scale ongoing study on the local drivers of the obesity epidemic among preadolescent children. PA, sedentary activity, and dietary intakes were assessed from recalls. Weight and height were measured. Setting. Barbados. Subjects. Sixty-two 62, 9–11-year-old school children. Results. Sugar-sweetened beverages provided 21% of energy consumed. Energy intake significantly explained BMI. Parents selected significantly more of children’s sedentary activities and encouraged mostly homework and chores 59%. Children’s self-selected school-based activity was significantly related to BMI. Conclusions. Childhood obesity prevention recommendations and research should focus on culture-specific practices that promote acquired taste for excess sugar and parent-child interactions regarding PA. Child influenced by school-based activity intervention may an important area for preventive intervention research.





Autor: Pamela S. Gaskin, Pamela Lai, Devon Guy, JaDon Knight, Maria Jackson, and Anders L. Nielsen

Fuente: https://www.hindawi.com/



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