Poststroke Muscle Architectural Parameters of the Tibialis Anterior and the Potential Implications for Rehabilitation of Foot DropReport as inadecuate




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Stroke Research and Treatment - Volume 2014 2014, Article ID 948475, 5 pages -

Research Article

Biomechanics and Movement Science Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA

Delaware Rehabilitation Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA

Received 4 April 2014; Revised 23 June 2014; Accepted 1 July 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Bruce Ovbiagele

Copyright © 2014 John W. Ramsay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Poststroke dorsiflexor weakness and paretic limb foot drop increase the risk of stumbling and falling and decrease overall functional mobility. It is of interest whether dorsiflexor muscle weakness is primarily neurological in origin or whether morphological differences also contribute to the impairment. Ten poststroke hemiparetic individuals were imaged bilaterally using noninvasive medical imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify changes in tibialis anterior muscle volume and muscle belly length. Ultrasonography was used to measure fascicle length and pennation angle in a neutral position. We found no clinically meaningful bilateral differences in any architectural parameter across all subjects, which indicates that these subjects have the muscular capacity to dorsiflex their foot. Therefore, poststroke dorsiflexor weakness is primarily neural in origin and likely due to muscle activation failure or increased spasticity of the plantar flexors. The current finding suggests that electrical stimulation methods or additional neuromuscular retraining may be more beneficial than targeting muscle strength i.e., increasing muscle mass.





Author: John W. Ramsay, Molly A. Wessel, Thomas S. Buchanan, and Jill S. Higginson

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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