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Journal of Environmental and Public HealthVolume 2011 2011, Article ID 463701, 9 pages

Research Article

Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA

West Virginia Rural Health Research Center, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA

Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA

Received 20 October 2010; Revised 8 March 2011; Accepted 3 May 2011

Academic Editor: Michael Bates

Copyright © 2011 Juhua Luo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. An increased risk of lung cancer has been observed at exposure to certain industrial chemicals in occupational settings; however, less is known about their carcinogenic potential to the general population when those agents are released into the environment. Methods. We used the Toxics Release Inventory TRI database and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results SEER data to conduct an ecological study at the county level. We used multiple linear regression to assess the association of age-adjusted lung cancer incidence with the quantities of on-site air and water releases of six selected industrial chemicals including arsenic, 1,3 butadiene, cadmium, chromium, formaldehyde, and nickel after controlling for other risk variables. Results. Overall, we observed a significantly increased risk of lung cancer incidence associated with releases of chromium, formaldehyde, and nickel. The links were present for both males and females. Significant effects were present in nonmetropolitan but not metropolitan counties. Releases of arsenic, 1,3 butadiene, and cadmium were reported by small numbers of facilities, and no relationships to lung cancer incidence were detected. Conclusions. Our results suggest that environmental exposure to chromium, formaldehyde, and nickel from TRI sites may increase population risk of lung cancer. These findings need to be confirmed in individual-level studies, but in congruence with the precautionary principle in environmental science, support prudent efforts to limit release of these agents into the environment.





Autor: Juhua Luo, Michael Hendryx, and Alan Ducatman

Fuente: https://www.hindawi.com/



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