The prevalence of injection-site reactions with disease-modifying therapies and their effect on adherence in patients with multiple sclerosis: an observational studyReportar como inadecuado




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BMC Neurology

, 11:144

Demyelinating diseases

Abstract

BackgroundInterferon beta IFNβ and glatiramer acetate GA are administered by subcutaneous SC or intramuscular IM injection. Patients with multiple sclerosis MS often report injection-site reactions ISRs as a reason for noncompliance or switching therapies. The aim of this study was to compare the proportion of patients on different formulations of IFNβ or GA who experienced ISRs and who switched or discontinued therapy because of ISRs.

MethodsThe Swiss MS Skin Project was an observational multicenter study. Patients with MS or clinically isolated syndrome who were on the same therapy for at least 2 years were enrolled. A skin examination was conducted at the first study visit and 1 year later.

ResultsThe 412 patients enrolled were on 1 of 4 disease-modifying therapies for at least 2 years: IM IFNβ-1a n = 82, SC IFNβ-1b n = 123, SC IFNβ-1a n = 184, or SC GA n = 23. At first evaluation, ISRs were reported by fewer patients on IM IFNβ-1a 13.4% than on SC IFNβ-1b 57.7%; P < 0.0001, SC IFNβ-1a 67.9%; P < 0.0001, or SC GA 30.4%; P = not significant NS. No patient on IM IFNβ-1a missed a dose in the previous 4 weeks because of ISRs, compared with 5.7% of patients on SC IFNβ-1b P = 0.044, 7.1% of patients on SC IFNβ-1a P = 0.011, and 4.3% of patients on SC GA P = NS. Primary reasons for discontinuing or switching therapy were ISRs or lack of efficacy. Similar patterns were observed at 1 year.

ConclusionsPatients on IM IFNβ-1a had fewer ISRs and were less likely to switch therapies than patients on other therapies. This study may have implications in selecting initial therapy or, for patients considering switching or discontinuing therapy because of ISRs, selecting an alternative option.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1471-2377-11-144 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Autor: Karsten Beer - Martin Müller - Anna Marie Hew-Winzeler - Adriano Bont - Philippe Maire - Xiaojun You - Pamela Foulds - Je

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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