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BMC Neurology

, 12:16

Neurocritical care

Abstract

BackgroundThe aim of this paper is to examine factors associated with discharge destination after acquired brain injury in a publicly insured population using the Anderson Behavioral Model as a framework.

MethodsWe utilized a retrospective cohort design. Inpatient data from provincial acute care records from fiscal years 2003-4 to 2006-7 with a diagnostic code of traumatic brain injury TBI and non-traumatic brain injury nTBI in Ontario, Canada were obtained for the study. Using multinomial logistic regression models, we examined predisposing, need and enabling factors from inpatient records in relation to major discharge outcomes such as discharge to home, inpatient rehabilitation and other institutionalized care.

ResultsMultinomial logistic regression revealed that need factors were strongly correlated with discharge destinations overall. Higher scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index were associated with discharge to other institutionalized care in the nTBI population. Length of stay and special care days were identified as markers for severity and were both strongly positively correlated with discharge to other institutionalized care and inpatient rehabilitation, compared to discharge home, in both nTBI and TBI populations. Injury by motor vehicle collisions was found to be positively correlated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation and other institutionalized care for patients with TBI. Controlling for need factors, rural location was associated with discharge to home versus inpatient rehabilitation.

ConclusionsThese findings show that need factors Charlson Comorbidity Index, length of stay, and number of special care days are most significant in terms of discharge destination. However, there is evidence that other factors such as rural location and access to supplemental insurance e.g., through motor vehicle insurance may influence discharge destination outcomes as well. These findings should be considered in creating more equitable access to healthcare services across the continuum of care.

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Autor: Amy Y Chen - Brandon Zagorski - Daria Parsons - Rika Vander Laan - Vincy Chan - Angela Colantonio

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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