Independent associations of childhood and current socioeconomic status with risk of self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis in a family-medicine cohort of North-CaroliniansReportar como inadecuado




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BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

, 14:327

Epidemiology of musculoskeletal disorders

Abstract

BackgroundAssociations of socioeconomic status SES with the prevalence of various forms of arthritis are well documented. Increasing evidence suggests that SES during childhood is a lasting determinant of health, but its association with the onset of arthritis remains unclear.

MethodsCross-sectional data on 1276 participants originated from 22 family practices in North-Carolina, USA. We created 4-level high, medium, low, lowest current SES and childhood SES summary scores based on parental and participant education, occupation and homeownership. We investigated associations of individual SES characteristics, summary scores and SES trajectories e.g. high-low with self-reported arthritis in logistic regression models progressively adjusted for race and gender, age, then BMI, and clustered by family practice.

ResultsWe found evidence for independent associations of both childhood and current SES with the reporting of arthritis across our models. In covariate-adjusted models simultaneously including current and childhood SES, compared with high SES participants in the lowest childhood SES category OR = 1.39 95% CI = 1.04, 1.85 and those in the low OR = 1.66 95% CI = 1.14, 2.42 and lowest OR = 2.08 95% CI = 1.16, 3.74 categories of current SES had significantly greater odds of having self-reported arthritis.

ConclusionsCurrent SES and childhood SES are both associated with the odds of reporting arthritis within this primary-care population, although the possibly superseding influence of existing circumstances must be noted. BMI was a likely mechanism in the association of childhood SES with arthritis onset, and research is needed to elucidate further pathways linking the socioeconomic environment across life-stages and the development of rheumatic diseases.

KeywordsArthritis Lifecourse SES Health disparities AbbreviationsBMIBody mass index

NC-FM-RNNorth Carolina family-medicine research network

OAOsteoarthritis

RARheumatoid arthritis

SESSocioeconomic status

SODEIndividual and community social determinants of arthritis outcomes study.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1471-2474-14-327 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Autor: Antoine R Baldassari - Rebecca J Cleveland - Leigh F Callahan

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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