Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine AvailabilityReportar como inadecuado




Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine Availability - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

BioMed Research International - Volume 2014 2014, Article ID 959420, 9 pages -

Research Article

Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Institute of Biomedicine, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

CIBER Obesity and Nutrition, Institute of Health Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain

Received 5 November 2013; Revised 30 December 2013; Accepted 16 January 2014; Published 24 February 2014

Academic Editor: Stelvio M. Bandiera

Copyright © 2014 David Sabater et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Hyperlipidic diets limit glucose oxidation and favor amino acid preservation, hampering the elimination of excess dietary nitrogen and the catabolic utilization of amino acids. We analyzed whether reduced urea excretion was a consequence of higher ; nitrite, nitrate, and other derivatives availability caused by increased nitric oxide production in metabolic syndrome. Rats fed a cafeteria diet for 30 days had a higher intake and accumulation of amino acid nitrogen and lower urea excretion. There were no differences in plasma nitrate or nitrite. and creatinine excretion accounted for only a small part of total nitrogen excretion. Rats fed a cafeteria diet had higher plasma levels of glutamine, serine, threonine, glycine, and ornithine when compared with controls, whereas arginine was lower. Liver carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I activity was higher in cafeteria diet-fed rats, but arginase I was lower. The high carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity and ornithine levels suggest activation of the urea cycle in cafeteria diet-fedrats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and-or availability.





Autor: David Sabater, Silvia Agnelli, Sofía Arriarán, José-Antonio Fernández-López, María del Mar Romero, Marià Alemany, and

Fuente: https://www.hindawi.com/



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