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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology - Volume 13 1999, Issue 1, Pages 31-37

Original Article

Department of Pediatrics, Health Science Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Department of Community Health Sciences, Health Science Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Department of Medicine, Health Science Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Received 11 March 1998; Accepted 7 July 1998

Copyright © 1999 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License CC BY-NC http:-creativecommons.org-licenses-by-nc-4.0-, which permits reuse, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Members of a subset of first-degree relatives of adults with Crohn’s disease have been shown to have an increased baseline intestinal permeability and-or an exaggerated increase in intestinal permeability after the administration of acetylsalicylic acid.

PURPOSE: To determine intestinal permeability in unaffected first-degree relatives of children with Crohn’s disease before and after the administration of an ibuprofen challenge.

METHODS: Lactulose-mannitol ratios, a measure of intestinal permeability, were determined in 14 healthy control families 41 subjects and 14 families with a child with Crohn’s disease 36 relatives, 14 probands before and after ingestion of ibuprofen. An upper reference limit was defined using the control group as mean ± 2 SD.

RESULTS: The proportion of healthy, first-degree relatives with an exaggerated response to ibuprofen 20%, 95% CI 7% to 33% was significantly higher than controls P=0.003. The exaggerated response was more common among siblings than among parents of pediatric probands.

CONCLUSIONS: Members of a subset of first-degree relatives of children with Crohn’s disease have an exaggerated increase in intestinal permeability after ibuprofen ingestion. These findings are compatible with there being a genetic link between abnormalities of intestinal permeability and Crohn’s disease.





Autor: Samuel A Zamora, Robert J Hilsden, Jon B Meddings, J Decker Butzner, R Brent Scott, and Lloyd R Sutherland

Fuente: https://www.hindawi.com/



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