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BioMed Research International - Volume 2014 2014, Article ID 361790, 7 pages -

Research Article

Aged and Extended Care Services, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network and Adelaide Geriatric Training and Research with Aged Care G-TRAC Center, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Level 8B Main Building, 21 Woodville Road, Woodville South, Adelaide, SA 5011, Australia

The Health Observatory, Discipline of Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia

Discipline of Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia

Department of Anaesthesia, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia

Received 27 February 2014; Accepted 11 June 2014; Published 3 July 2014

Academic Editor: Maurizio Gallucci

Copyright © 2014 Solomon Yu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Sarcopenia is the presence of low muscle mass and low muscle function. The aim of this study was to establish cutoffs for low muscle mass using three published methods and to compare the prevalence of sarcopenia in older Australians. Methods. Gender specific cutoffs levels were identified for low muscle mass using three different methods. Low grip strength was determined using established cutoffs of <30 kg for men and <20 kg for women to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia. Results. Gender specific cutoffs levels for low muscle mass identified were a <6.89 kg-m

for men and <4.32 kg-m

for women, <2 standard deviation SD of a young reference population; b <7.36 kg-m

for men and <5.81 kg-m

for women from the lowest 20% percentile of the older group; and c <−2.15 for men and <−1.42 for women from the lowest 20% of the residuals of linear regressions of appendicular skeletal mass, adjusted for fat mass and height. Prevalence of sarcopenia in older 65 years and older people by these three methods for men was 2.5%, 6.2%, and 6.4% and for women 0.3%, 9.3%, and 8.5%, respectively. Conclusions. Sarcopenia is common but consensus on the best method to confirm low muscle mass is required.





Autor: Solomon Yu, Sarah Appleton, Robert Adams, Ian Chapman, Gary Wittert, Thavarajah Visvanathan, and Renuka Visvanathan

Fuente: https://www.hindawi.com/



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