Insights into Chinese perspectives on do-not-resuscitate DNR orders from an examination of DNR order form completeness for cancer patientsReportar como inadecuado




Insights into Chinese perspectives on do-not-resuscitate DNR orders from an examination of DNR order form completeness for cancer patients - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 21, Issue 9, pp 2593–2598

First Online: 08 May 2013Received: 21 January 2013Accepted: 21 April 2013DOI: 10.1007-s00520-013-1827-2

Cite this article as: Wen, KY., Lin, YC., Cheng, JF. et al. Support Care Cancer 2013 21: 2593. doi:10.1007-s00520-013-1827-2

Abstract

PurposeDiscussing end-of-life care with patients is often considered taboo, and signing a do-not-resuscitate DNR order is difficult for most patients, especially in Chinese culture. This study investigated distributions and details related to the signing of DNR orders, as well as the completeness of various DNR order forms.

MethodsRetrospective chart reviews were performed. We screened all charts from a teaching hospital in Taiwan for patients who died of cancer during the period from January 2010 to December 2011. A total of 829 patient records were included in the analysis. The details of the DNR order forms were recorded.

ResultsThe DNR order signing rate was 99.8 %. The percentage of DNR orders signed by patients themselves DNR-P was 22.6 %, while the percentage of orders signed by surrogates DNR-S was 77.2 %. The percentage of signed DNR forms that were completely filled out was 78.4 %. The percentage of DNR-S forms that were completed was 81.7 %, while the percentage of DNR-P forms that were completely filled out was only 67.6 %.

ConclusionAlmost all the cancer patients had a signed DNR order, but for the majority of them, the order was signed by a surrogate. Negative attitudes of discussing death from medical professionals and-or the family members of patients may account for the higher number of signed DNR-S orders than DNR-P orders. Moreover, early obtainment of signed DNR orders should be sought, as getting the orders earlier could promote the quality of end-of-life care, especially in non-oncology wards.

KeywordsChinese culture Palliative care Do-not-resuscitate DNR End-of-life care discussion Cancer  Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Kuei-Yen Wen - Ya-Chin Lin - Ju-Feng Cheng - Pei-Chun Chou - Chih-Hsin Wei - Yun-Fang Chen - Jia-Ling Sun

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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