The effect of the presence of quiescent female nymphs, males and their spermatophores on spermatophore placement in two species of eriophyoid mitesReportar como inadecuado




The effect of the presence of quiescent female nymphs, males and their spermatophores on spermatophore placement in two species of eriophyoid mites - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 433–444

First Online: 18 January 2013Received: 24 August 2012Accepted: 04 January 2013DOI: 10.1007-s10493-013-9657-y

Cite this article as: Michalska, K. & Studnicki, M. Exp Appl Acarol 2013 60: 433. doi:10.1007-s10493-013-9657-y

Abstract

Under sex dissociated sperm transfer, females seek spermatophores and pick up sperm without male assistance. In several species males adjust spermatophore deposition rate to the presence of conspecifics. It is not known, however, which factors could favor such elasticity in non-pairing males. In this paper, we compare male response towards conspecifics between the sex dissociated eriophyoid mites Aculus fockeui Nalepa and Trouessart and Aculops allotrichus Nalepa. The species differ significantly in male reproductive strategies and, consequently, the intensity of male–male-competition. Aculus fockeui males deposit spematophores all over the leaves and occasionally leave single spermatophores beside quiescent female nymphs QFNs. In contrast, A. allotrichus males guard QFNs and encircle them with spermatophores. In this study, males of both species deposited spermatophores close to and apart from the rival spermatophores. Aculops allotrichus males had similar spermatophore output whether they were kept alone or in a group of seven males. They did not change spermatophore output in the presence of five rival spermatophores, a QFN or a QFN and varying number of rivals, either. In contrast, A. fockeui males increased spermatophore output in the presence of rival spermatophores or when on the arena with a QFN the male number increased to eight males. They did not respond, however, to the presence of a QFN and one rival or a QFN alone. The possible effect of the species-specific intensity of male–male competition, population density, the availability of receptive females and the rate of spermatophore output on the flexibility of eriophyoid spermatophore deposition is discussed.

KeywordsSpermatophore Eriophyoidea Aculops allotrichus Aculus fockeui Sex dissociation Male–male competition  Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Katarzyna Michalska - Marcin Studnicki

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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