Surrogate tree cavities: boxes with artificial substrate can serve as temporary habitat for Osmoderma barnabita Motsch. Coleoptera, CetoniinaeReportar como inadecuado




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Journal of Insect Conservation

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 855–861

First Online: 28 August 2014Received: 24 April 2014Accepted: 21 August 2014DOI: 10.1007-s10841-014-9692-y

Cite this article as: Hilszczański, J., Jaworski, T., Plewa, R. et al. J Insect Conserv 2014 18: 855. doi:10.1007-s10841-014-9692-y

Abstract

Many saproxylic insects have declined or became extinct, mainly due to habitat loss and fragmentation, and their survival increasingly depends on active conservation. Efforts to achieve this goal may be supported by the introduction of new methods, including creation of artificial habitats. Here we present results of studies on the use of wooden boxes mimicking tree cavities for an endangered saproxylic species, Osmoderma barnabita. Boxes were filled with the feeding substrate for larvae and installed on trees. Second and third-instar O. barnabita larvae were introduced in half of the boxes; the remaining ones were left uninhabited. Later inspection of boxes showed a high survival rate of introduced larvae, as well as successful breeding of a new generation inside the boxes. At the same time boxes were not colonized by the local population of O. barnabita, although other cetoniids did so. The co-occurring larvae of other cetoniids did not affect O. barnabita larvae. Thermal conditions inside boxes and natural tree cavities were almost identical and based on the results of our studies we conclude that wooden boxes may serve as temporary habitat for O. barnabita. They may be particularly useful in cases of destruction of species’ natural habitat, in restoration programs, and have the potential to act as a ‘stepping stones’ in cases of a lack of habitat continuity.

KeywordsArtificial habitat Hollow trees Saproxylic insects Conservation method Protaetia Cetonia  Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Jacek Hilszczański - Tomasz Jaworski - Radosław Plewa - Nicklas Jansson

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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