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BMC Public Health

, 12:456

First Online: 19 June 2012Received: 06 June 2012Accepted: 11 June 2012DOI: 10.1186-1471-2458-12-456

Cite this article as: Catley, D., Harris, K.J., Goggin, K. et al. BMC Public Health 2012 12: 456. doi:10.1186-1471-2458-12-456

Abstract

BackgroundAlthough the current Clinical Practice Guideline recommend Motivational Interviewing for use with smokers not ready to quit, the strength of evidence for its use is rated as not optimal. The purpose of the present study is to address key methodological limitations of previous studies by ensuring fidelity in the delivery of the Motivational Interviewing intervention, using an attention-matched control condition, and focusing on unmotivated smokers whom meta-analyses have indicated may benefit most from Motivational Interviewing. It is hypothesized that MI will be more effective at inducing quit attempts and smoking cessation at 6-month follow-up than brief advice to quit and an intensity-matched health education condition.

Methods-DesignA sample of adult community resident smokers N = 255 who report low motivation and readiness to quit are being randomized using a 2:2:1 treatment allocation to Motivational Interviewing, Health Education, or Brief Advice. Over 6 months, participants in Motivational Interviewing and Health Education receive 4 individual counseling sessions and participants in Brief Advice receive one brief in-person individual session at baseline. Rigorous monitoring and independent verification of fidelity will assure the counseling approaches are distinct and delivered as planned. Participants complete surveys at baseline, week 12 and 6-month follow-up to assess demographics, smoking characteristics, and smoking outcomes. Participants who decide to quit are provided with a self-help guide to quitting, help with a quit plan, and free pharmacotherapy. The primary outcome is self-report of one or more quit attempts lasting at least 24 hours between randomization and 6-month follow-up. The secondary outcome is biochemically confirmed 7-day point prevalence cessation at 6-month follow-up. Hypothesized mediators of the presumed treatment effect on quit attempts are greater perceived autonomy support and autonomous motivation. Use of pharmacotherapy is a hypothesized mediator of Motivational Interviewing’s effect on cessation.

DiscussionThis trial will provide the most rigorous evaluation to date of Motivational Interviewing’s efficacy for encouraging unmotivated smokers to make a quit attempt. It will also provide effect-size estimates of MI’s impact on smoking cessation to inform future clinical trials and inform the Clinical Practice Guideline.

Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT01188018

KeywordsSmoking Motivational Interviewing Health education Brief advice AbbreviationsMIMotivational interviewing

HEHealth education

BABrief advice.

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Autor: Delwyn Catley - Kari Jo Harris - Kathy Goggin - Kimber Richter - Karen Williams - Christi Patten - Ken Resnicow - Edward 

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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