Cross-sector collaborations in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander childhood disability: a systematic integrative review and theory-based synthesisReport as inadecuate




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International Journal for Equity in Health

, 13:126

First Online: 18 December 2014Received: 22 September 2014Accepted: 09 December 2014DOI: 10.1186-s12939-014-0126-y

Cite this article as: Green, A., DiGiacomo, M., Luckett, T. et al. Int J Equity Health 2014 13: 126. doi:10.1186-s12939-014-0126-y

Abstract

IntroductionAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Australia experience a higher prevalence of disability and socio-economic disadvantage than other Australian children. Early intervention is vital for improved health outcomes, but complex and fragmented service provision impedes access. There have been international and national policy shifts towards inter-sector collaborative responses to disability, but more needs to be known about how collaboration works in practice.

MethodsA systematic integrative literature review using a narrative synthesis of peer-reviewed and grey literature was undertaken to describe components of inter- and intra-sector collaborations among services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with a disability and their families. The findings were synthesized using the conceptual model of the ecological framework.

ResultsThirteen articles published in a peer-reviewed journal and 18 articles from the grey literature met inclusion criteria. Important factors in inter- and intra-sector collaborations identified included: structure of government departments and agencies, and policies at the macro- government system level; communication, financial and human resources, and service delivery setting at the exo- organizational system level; and relationships and inter- and intra-professional learning at the meso- provider system level.

ConclusionsThe policy shift towards inter-sector collaborative approaches represents an opportunity for the health, education and social service sectors and their providers to work collaboratively in innovative ways to improve service access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with a disability and their families. The findings of this review depict a national snapshot of collaboration, but as each community is unique, further research into collaboration within local contexts is required to ensure collaborative solutions to improve service access are responsive to local needs and sustainable.

KeywordsAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Childhood Disability Collaboration Inter-sector Intra-sector AbbreviationsOMOtitis Media

WHOWorld Health Organization

MoUmemoranda of understanding

MeSHMedical Subject Headings

CINAHLCumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature

ERICEducation Resources Information Center

APAISAustralian Public Affairs Information Service

APAIS-healthAustralian Public Affairs Information Service - Health

AandTSIhealthAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

MAIS-ATSISMulticultural Australia and Immigration Studies - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Subset

STROBESTrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology

TRENDTransparent Reporting of Evaluations with Nonrandomized Designs

MMATMixed Methods Appraisal Tool

AMSTARMeasurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews

SpICESpecialist Integrated Community Engagement

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-s12939-014-0126-y contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Anna Green - Michelle DiGiacomo - Tim Luckett - Penelope Abbott - Patricia Mary Davidson - Joanne Delaney - Patricia Delan

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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