One size does not fit all: a qualitative content analysis of the importance of existing quality improvement capacity in the implementation of Releasing Time to Care: the Productive Ward™ in Saskatchewan, CanadaReport as inadecuate




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BMC Health Services Research

, 14:642

Organization, structure and delivery of healthcare

Abstract

BackgroundReleasing Time to Care: The Productive Ward™ RTC is a method for conducting continuous quality improvement QI. The Saskatchewan Ministry of Health mandated its implementation in Saskatchewan, Canada between 2008 and 2012. Subsequently, a research team was developed to evaluate its impact on the nursing unit environment. We sought to explore the influence of the unit’s existing QI capacity on their ability to engage with RTC as a program for continuous QI.

MethodsWe conducted interviews with staff from 8 nursing units and asked them to speak about their experience doing RTC. Using qualitative content analysis, and guided by the Organizing for Quality framework, we describe the existing QI capacity and impact of RTC on the unit environment.

ResultsThe results focus on 2 units chosen to highlight extreme variation in existing QI capacity. Unit B was characterized by a strong existing environment. RTC was implemented in an environment with a motivated manager and collaborative culture. Aided by the structural support provided by the organization, the QI capacity on this unit was strengthened through RTC. Staff recognized the potential of using the RTC processes to support QI work. Staff on unit E did not have the same experience with RTC. Like unit B, they had similar structural supports provided by their organization but they did not have the same existing cultural or political environment to facilitate the implementation of RTC. They did not have internal motivation and felt they were only doing RTC because they had to. Though they had some success with RTC activities, the staff did not have the same understanding of the methods that RTC could provide for continuous QI work.

ConclusionsRTC has the potential to be a strong tool for engaging units to do QI. This occurs best when RTC is implemented in a supporting environment. One size does not fit all and administrative bodies must consider the unique context of each environment prior to implementing large-scale QI projects. Use of an established framework, like Organizing for Quality, could highlight the distinctive supports needed in particular care environments to increase the likelihood of successful engagement.

KeywordsProductive ward Releasing time to care Organizing for quality Nursing Qualitative methodology Quality improvement capacity Change mechanisms AbbreviationsRTCReleasing time to care

QIQuality improvement

WOWWell organized ward

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-s12913-014-0642-x contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Jessica Hamilton - Tanya Verrall - Jill Maben - Peter Griffiths - Kyla Avis - G Ross Baker - Gary Teare

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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