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Case Reports in PathologyVolume 2013 2013, Article ID 973865, 3 pages

Case Report

Department of Urology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan

Department of Pathology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan

Department of Pathology, Kyorin University Graduate School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611, Japan

Division of Anatomical and Surgical Pathology, Yokohama City University Hospital, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan

Received 31 January 2013; Accepted 27 February 2013

Academic Editors: S. Baeesa, T. Batinac, R. L. Haas, W. Khalbuss, P. Kornprat, M. Marino, and W. P. Wang

Copyright © 2013 Ryoko Sakata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The juxtaglomerular cell tumor JGCT is a rare renal tumor characterized by excessive renin secretion causing intractable hypertension and hypokalemia. However, asymptomatic nonfunctioning JGCT is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of nonfunctioning JGCT in a 31-year-old woman. The patient presented with a left renal tumor without hypertension or hypokalemia. Under a clinical diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumor was located in the middle portion adjacent to the renal pelvis, measuring 2 cm in size. Pathologically, the tumor was composed of cuboidal cells forming a solid arrangement, immunohistochemically positive for renin. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as JGCT. In cases with hyperreninism, preoperative diagnosis of JGCT is straightforward but difficult in nonfunctioning case. Generally, JGCT presents a benign biological behavior. Therefore, we should take nonfunctioning JGCT into the differential diagnoses for renal tumors, especially in younger patients to avoid excessive surgery.





Autor: Ryoko Sakata, Hiroaki Shimoyamada, Masahiro Yanagisawa, Takayuki Murakami, Kazuhide Makiyama, Noboru Nakaigawa, Yoshiaki Ina

Fuente: https://www.hindawi.com/



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