Re-evaluation of blood mercury, lead and cadmium concentrations in the Inuit population of Nunavik Québec: a cross-sectional studyReportar como inadecuado




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Environmental Health

, 7:25

First Online: 02 June 2008Received: 26 November 2007Accepted: 02 June 2008DOI: 10.1186-1476-069X-7-25

Cite this article as: Fontaine, J., Dewailly, É., Benedetti, JL. et al. Environ Health 2008 7: 25. doi:10.1186-1476-069X-7-25

Abstract

BackgroundArctic populations are exposed to mercury, lead and cadmium through their traditional diet. Studies have however shown that cadmium exposure is most often attributable to tobacco smoking. The aim of this study is to examine the trends in mercury, lead and cadmium exposure between 1992 and 2004 in the Inuit population of Nunavik Northern Québec, Canada using the data obtained from two broad scale health surveys, and to identify sources of exposure in 2004.

MethodsIn 2004, 917 adults aged between 18 and 74 were recruited in the 14 communities of Nunavik to participate to a broad scale health survey. Blood samples were collected and analysed for metals by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and dietary and life-style characteristics were documented by questionnaires. Results were compared with data obtained in 1992, where 492 people were recruited for a similar survey in the same population.

ResultsMean blood concentration of mercury was 51.2 nmol-L, which represent a 32% decrease p < 0.001 between 1992 and 2004. Mercury blood concentrations were mainly explained by age partial r = 0.20; p < 0.0001, and the most important source of exposure to mercury was marine mammal meat consumption partial r = 0.04; p < 0.0001. In 2004, mean blood concentration of lead was 0.19 μmol-L and showed a 55% decrease since 1992. No strong associations were observed with any dietary source, and lead concentrations were mainly explained by age partial r = 0.20.; p < 0.001. Blood cadmium concentrations showed a 22% decrease p < 0.001 between 1992 and 2004. Once stratified according to tobacco use, means varied between 5.3 nmol-L in never-smokers and 40.4 nmol-L in smokers. Blood cadmium concentrations were mainly associated with tobacco smoking partial r = 0.56; p < 0.0001, while consumption of caribou liver and kidney remain a minor source of cadmium exposure among never-smokers.

ConclusionImportant decreases in mercury, lead and cadmium exposure were observed. Mercury decrease could be explained by dietary changes and the ban of lead cartridges use likely contributed to the decrease in lead exposure. Blood cadmium concentrations remain high and, underscoring the need for intensive tobacco smoking prevention campaigns in the Nunavik population.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1476-069X-7-25 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Autor: Julie Fontaine - Éric Dewailly - Jean-Louis Benedetti - Daria Pereg - Pierre Ayotte - Serge Déry

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/



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