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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 132, Issue 3, pp 1281–1305

First Online: 05 May 2016Accepted: 25 April 2016DOI: 10.1007-s11205-016-1344-z

Cite this article as: Notten, N., Grunow, D. & Verbakel, E. Soc Indic Res 2017 132: 1281. doi:10.1007-s11205-016-1344-z

Abstract

In modern welfare states, family policies may resolve the tension between employment and care-focused demands. However these policies sometimes have adverse consequences for distinct social groups. This study examined gender and educational differences in working parents’ perceived work–family conflict and used a comparative approach to test whether family policies, in particular support for child care and leave from paid work, are capable of reducing work–family conflict as well as the gender and educational gaps in work–family conflict. We use data from the European Social Survey 2010 for 20 countries and 5296 respondents parents, extended with information on national policies for maternity and parental leave and child care support from the OECD Family Database. Employing multilevel analysis, we find that mothers and the higher educated report most work–family conflict. Policies supporting child care reduce the level of experienced work–family conflict; family leave policy appears to have no alleviating impact on working parents’ work–family conflict. Our findings indicate that family policies appear to be unable to reduce the gender gap in conflict perception and even widen the educational gap in work–family conflict.

KeywordsWork–family conflict Gender and educational differences Social policy Cross-national  Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Natascha Notten - Daniela Grunow - Ellen Verbakel

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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