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BMC Cardiovascular Disorders

, 14:151

Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk

Abstract

BackgroundPrevious studies indicated that the clustering of major cardiovascular disease CVD risk factors is common, and multiple unhealthy lifestyles are responsible for the clustering of CVD risk factors. However, little is known about the direct association between the volume load and the clustering of CVD risk factors in general population.

MethodsWe investigated the association of the clustering of CVD risk factors defined as two or more of the following factors: hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and overweight with volume load, which was evaluated by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Hypovolaemia was defined as extracellular water-total body water ECW-TBW at and under the 10th percentile for the normal population.

ResultsAmong the 7900 adults, only 29.3% were free of any pre-defined CVD risk factors and 40.8% had clustering of CVD risk factors. Hypovolaemia in clustering group was statistically higher than that either in the single or in the none risk factor group, which was 23.7% vs. 17.0% and 10.0%, respectively P <0.001. As a categorical outcome, the percentage of the lowest quartiles of ECW-TBW and TBW-TBWwatson in clustering group were statistically higher than either those in the single or in the none risk factor group, which were 44.9% vs. 36.9% and 25.1% P <0.001, 36.2% vs. 32.2% and 25.0%, respectively P <0.001. After adjusting of potential confounders, hypovolaemia was significantly associated with clustering of CVD risk factors, with an OR of 1.66 95% CI, 1.45-1.90.

ConclusionsHypovolaemia was associated with clustering of major CVD risk factors, which further confirms the importance of lifestyle for the development of CVD.

KeywordsVolume load Cardiovascular disease Bioelectrical impedance analysis Body fluid composition Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1471-2261-14-151 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Xianglei Kong, Xiaojing Ma contributed equally to this work.

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Autor: Xianglei Kong - Xiaojing Ma - Jing Yao - Shuting Zheng - Meiyu Cui - Dongmei Xu

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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