Socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion influence adults’ willingness to grant children greater independent mobility: A cross-sectional studyReportar como inadecuado




Socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion influence adults’ willingness to grant children greater independent mobility: A cross-sectional study - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

BMC Public Health

, 15:690

First Online: 22 July 2015Received: 09 June 2015Accepted: 14 July 2015DOI: 10.1186-s12889-015-2053-2

Cite this article as: Schoeppe, S., Duncan, M.J., Badland, H.M. et al. BMC Public Health 2015 15: 690. doi:10.1186-s12889-015-2053-2

Abstract

BackgroundIn developed countries, children’s independent mobility levels are low. Built environmental factors and parental safety concerns are well-known to predict the level of independent mobility adults grant to children. In contrast, the influence of adults’ socio-demographic characteristics and neighbourhood social cohesion on children’s independent mobility is largely unexplored. This study investigated the influence of adults’ socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion on distances they would permit children for independent travel and outdoor play.

MethodsIn 2013, a random sample of 1293 Australian adults mean age: 56.1 years, 52 % male, 81 % parents participated in the Queensland Social Survey QSS via computer-assisted telephone interview. Socio-demographic factors measured included age, sex, parental status, education and area-level socio-economic disadvantage. Perceived neighbourhood social cohesion was assessed using a standardised scale. Adults reported the distances children aged 8–12 years should be allowed to walk-cycle to places, and play outdoors without adults. Responses were categorised into ‘within sight’, < 0.5 kilometres km , 0.5-1 km and >1 km. Ordinal logistic regression was used to assess associations of socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion with distances adults would permit for children’s independent travel and outdoor play.

ResultsParents and adults with lower education were less likely to permit greater distances for children’s independent travel OR = 0.57 and OR = 0.59, respectively. Women, parents and adults with lower education were less likely to grant children greater distances for independent outdoor play OR = 0.61, OR = 0.50 and OR = 0.60, respectively. In contrast, adults with higher perceptions of neighbourhood social cohesion were more likely to permit children greater distances for independent travel OR = 1.05and outdoor play OR = 1.05. Adult age and area-level socio-economic disadvantage were not associated with distances adults would permit for independent travel and outdoor play.

ConclusionsWomen, parents particularly those of younger children, adults with lower education and those who perceived neighbourhood social cohesion as being lower were less willing to let children independently travel further away from home. Interventions to increase children’s independent mobility may be more effective if targeted to these groups. In addition, increasing neighbourhood social cohesion may help increase adults’ willingness to grant children greater independent mobility.

KeywordsParent Community cohesion Unsupervised Movement Young people Survey AbbreviationsQSSQueensland Social Survey

SEIFASocio-economic index for areas

Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Stephanie Schoeppe - Mitch J. Duncan - Hannah M. Badland - Stephanie Alley - Susan Williams - Amanda L. Rebar - Corneel 

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







Documentos relacionados