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BMC Research Notes

, 7:181

First Online: 27 March 2014Received: 05 July 2012Accepted: 21 March 2014DOI: 10.1186-1756-0500-7-181

Cite this article as: Ellert, U., Brettschneider, AK., Wiegand, S. et al. BMC Res Notes 2014 7: 181. doi:10.1186-1756-0500-7-181

Abstract

BackgroundPrevalence rates for overweight and obesity based on self-reported height and weight are underestimated, whereas the prevalence rate for underweight is slightly overestimated. Therefore a correction is needed. Aim of this study is to apply correction procedures to the prevalence rates developed on basis of self-reported and measured data from the representative German National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents KiGGS to self-reported data from the German Health Behaviour in School Aged Children HBSC study to determine whether correction leads to higher prevalence estimates of overweight and obesity as well as lower prevalence rates for underweight.

MethodsBMI classifications based on self-reported and measured height and weight from a subsample of the KiGGS study 2,565 adolescents aged 11–15 were used to estimate two different correction formulas. The first and the second correction function are described. Furthermore, the both formulas were applied to the prevalence rates from the HBSC study 7,274 adolescents aged 11–15 which are based on self-reports collected via self-administered questionnaires.

ResultsAfter applying the first correction function to self-reported data of the HBSC study, the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity increased from 5.5% to 7.8% compared to 10.4% in the KiGGS study and 2.7% to 3.8% compared to 7.8% in the KiGGS study, respectively, whereas the corrected prevalence rates of underweight and severe underweight decreased from 8.0% to 6.7% compared to 5.7% in the KiGGS study and from 5.5% to 3.3% compared to 2.4% in the KiGGS study, respectively. Application of the second correction function, which additionally considers body image, led to further slight corrections with an increase of the prevalence rates for overweight to 7.9% and for obese to 3.9%.

ConclusionSubjective BMI can be used to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents. Where there is evidence of bias, the prevalence estimates should be corrected using conditional probabilities that link measured and subjectively assessed BMI from a representative validation study. These corrections may be improved further by considering body image as an additional influential factor.

KeywordsPrevalence rates weight status Self-reports Corrected prevalence rates Overweight Body image AbbreviationsBMIBody mass index

HBSCGerman Health Behaviour in School Aged Children study

KiGGSGerman National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents

WHOWorld Health Organisation.

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Autor: Ute Ellert - Anna-Kristin Brettschneider - Susanna Wiegand - Bärbel-Maria Kurth

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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