Welfare Recipiency, by Educational Attainment. Indicator of the Month.Report as inadecuate




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One possible benefit of the availability of free or low cost education is reduced reliance on welfare and public assistance among those who attain higher levels of education. The extent to which people with more education rely less on welfare and public assistance is an indication of this benefit. In 1992, high school dropouts were three times more likely to receive income from Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) or public assistance than high school graduates who did not go on to college (17 percent versus 6 percent). Between 1972 and 1992, both high school dropouts and graduates who did not go on to college became more likely to receive AFDC or public assistance income. The increase in the likelihood of receiving welfare income was greater for high school dropouts than for graduates who did not go on to college. The difference between the two groups in the percentage receiving such income rose from 7 to 12 percent. However, not all people who attain higher levels of education do so because of the availability of low cost education. Therefore, the indicator may overstate this benefit from public investment in education. (A chart shows percentage of persons aged 25-34 who received income from AFDC or public assistance, by years of schooling completed: 1972-92. Two graphs identify percentage of persons 25-34 who received income from AFDC or public assistance, by years of schooling completed: 1972-92. The first includes all persons; the second shows percentages by race/ethnicity.) (YLB)

Descriptors: Adults, Dropouts, Economically Disadvantaged, Educational Attainment, Educational Finance, Educational Status Comparison, Low Income Groups, Student Educational Objectives, Welfare Recipients, Welfare Services











Author: National Center for Education Statistics ED, Washington, DC.

Source: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=12537&id=ED385750







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