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Reference: King, AJ, Myatt, JP, Fürtbauer, I et al., (2015). Social density processes regulate the functioning and performance of foraging human teams. Scientific Reports, 5, Article: 18260.Citable link to this page:

 

Social density processes regulate the functioning and performance of foraging human teams

Abstract: Social density processes impact the activity and order of collective behaviours in a variety of biological systems. Much effort has been devoted to understanding how density of people affects collective human motion in the context of pedestrian flows. However, there is a distinct lack of empirical data investigating the effects of social density on human behaviour in cooperative contexts. Here, we examine the functioning and performance of human teams in a central-place foraging arena using high-resolution GPS data. We show that team functioning (level of coordination) is greatest at intermediate social densities, but contrary to our expectations, increased coordination at intermediate densities did not translate into improved collective foraging performance, and foraging accuracy was equivalent across our density treatments. We suggest that this is likely a consequence of foragers relying upon visual channels (local information) to achieve coordination but relying upon auditory channels (global information) to maximise foraging returns. These findings provide new insights for the development of more sophisticated models of human collective behaviour that consider different networks for communication (e.g. visual and vocal) that have the potential to operate simultaneously in cooperative contexts.

Peer Review status:Peer reviewedPublication status:PublishedVersion:Publisher's version Funder: Royal Veterinary College   Funder: Natural Environment Research Counci   Notes:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

Publisher Website: http://www.nature.com/

Journal: Scientific Reportssee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.nature.com/srep

Issue Date: 2015

pages:Article: 18260Identifiers

Urn: uuid:21ffdf73-37e5-4d67-8955-549850a9d793

Source identifier: 580320

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep18260

Issn: 2045-2322 Item Description

Type: Journal article;

Version: Publisher's version Tiny URL: pubs:580320

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Autor: King, AJ - - - Myatt, JP - - - Fürtbauer, I - - - Dunbar, RIM - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MSD, Experimental Psycho

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:21ffdf73-37e5-4d67-8955-549850a9d793



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