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Reference: Colles, Frances M., (2006). Population structure and dynamics of Campylobacter populations carried by wild birds and chickens reared in a free-range woodland environment. DPhil. University of Oxford.Citable link to this page:

 

Population structure and dynamics of Campylobacter populations carried by wild birds and chickens reared in a free-range woodland environment

Abstract: Ingestion of contaminated chicken meat is a major cause ofCampylobacteriosis in Europe and the USA. The environment, including wild birds,is considered to be an important reservoir for chicken colonization. The aims of thisstudy were to determine the population structure of Campylobacter amongst chickenand wild bird sources on a single farm, and to establish the extent to which genotypesflow between them and ultimately infect humans, using MLST and antigen sequencetyping.A pilot study amongst farm animals and wild birds in Lancashiredemonstrated that Campylobacter genotypes from human disease were common onthe farm and could be isolated from more than one animal source. Between 30-50%of wild geese and Starlings were shedding Campylobacter, with a seasonal peak inshedding rate in Spring. Genotypes were divergent from those previously isolatedfrom human disease, retail meat and farm animal sources, with the majority beingrestricted to the host source. The carriage rate of Campylobacter was between 70-100% amongst 78 free-range poultry flocks tested at 56 days of age. Up to sevengenotypes were found to co-exist within a flock, and genotypes varied throughout theyear on a random basis.Some Campylobacter strains were isolated from one farm site only, but asmall percentage of them had spread nationally and were stable over a period of adecade. A total of 23% of Campylobacter isolates from free-range chickens wereindistinguishable to those from human disease, and 5% were indistinguishable fromwild birds. A total of 6% of genotypes isolated from wild birds wereindistinguishable from those isolated from human disease. Wild birds could not becompletely disregarded as a potential reservoir of Campylobacter for both humansand poultry, but their role is likely to be limited.

Type of Award:DPhil Level of Award:Doctoral Awarding Institution: University of Oxford Notes:The digital copy of this thesis has been made available thanks to the generosity of Dr Leonard Polonsky

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Martin MaidenMore by this contributor

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 Bibliographic Details

Issue Date: 2006Identifiers

Urn: uuid:3dc7cdfb-29f6-4681-b8db-cb71129cd946

Source identifier: 603826014 Item Description

Type: Thesis;

Language: eng Subjects: Campylobacter infections Poultry Diseases Birds Zoonoses Microbial contamination Meat Contamination Birds as carriers of disease Tiny URL: td:603826014

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Autor: Colles, Frances M. - institutionUniversity of Oxford facultyDept. of Zoology facultyLife and Environmental Sciences Division - -

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:3dc7cdfb-29f6-4681-b8db-cb71129cd946



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