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Reference: Stagg, CJ, Bachtiar, V, O'Shea, J et al., (2012). Cortical activation changes underlying stimulation-induced behavioural gains in chronic stroke. Brain : a journal of neurology, 135 (Pt 1), 276-284.Citable link to this page:

 

Cortical activation changes underlying stimulation-induced behavioural gains in chronic stroke.

Abstract: Transcranial direct current stimulation, a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, is showing increasing promise as an adjunct therapy in rehabilitation following stroke. However, although significant behavioural improvements have been reported in proof-of-principle studies, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The rationale for transcranial direct current stimulation as therapy for stroke is that therapeutic stimulation paradigms increase activity in ipsilesional motor cortical areas, but this has not previously been directly tested for conventional electrode placements. This study was performed to test directly whether increases in ipsilesional cortical activation with transcranial direct current stimulation are associated with behavioural improvements in chronic stroke patients. Patients at least 6 months post-first stroke participated in a behavioural experiment (n = 13) or a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment (n = 11), each investigating the effects of three stimulation conditions in separate sessions: anodal stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere; cathodal stimulation to the contralesional hemisphere; and sham stimulation. Anodal (facilitatory) stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere led to significant improvements (5-10%) in response times with the affected hand in both experiments. This improvement was associated with an increase in movement-related cortical activity in the stimulated primary motor cortex and functionally interconnected regions. Cathodal (inhibitory) stimulation to the contralesional hemisphere led to a functional improvement only when compared with sham stimulation. We show for the first time that the significant behavioural improvements produced by anodal stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere are associated with a functionally relevant increase in activity within the ipsilesional primary motor cortex in patients with a wide range of disabilities following stroke.

Publication status:Published

Bibliographic Details

Journal: Brain : a journal of neurologysee more from them

Issue Date: 2012-1

pages:276-284Identifiers

Urn: uuid:9dd56f11-23c9-4234-9fc3-0756256ac2c4

Source identifier: 241778

Eissn: 1460-2156

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awr313

Issn: 0006-8950 Item Description

Type: Journal article;

Language: eng Keywords: Humans Cerebral Cortex Psychomotor Performance Electric Stimulation Therapy Hand Strength Reaction Time Evoked Potentials, Motor Adult Aged Aged, 80 and over Stroke Middle Aged Male Tiny URL: pubs:241778

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Autor: Stagg, CJ - - - Bachtiar, V - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MSD, Clinical Neuroscience - - - O'Shea, J - institutio

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:9dd56f11-23c9-4234-9fc3-0756256ac2c4



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