EEG response to sodium nitrite may predict delayed cerebral ischaemia after severe subarachnoid haemorrhageReportar como inadecuado




EEG response to sodium nitrite may predict delayed cerebral ischaemia after severe subarachnoid haemorrhage - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Reference: Garry, P, Rowland, M, Ezra, M et al., (2016). EEG response to sodium nitrite may predict delayed cerebral ischaemia after severe subarachnoid haemorrhage. Critical Care Medicine.Citable link to this page:

 

EEG response to sodium nitrite may predict delayed cerebral ischaemia after severe subarachnoid haemorrhage

Abstract: Objective: Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed early brain injury (EBI), with disruption of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway playing an important pathophysiological role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) parameters such as alpha/delta frequency ratio (ADR) are surrogate markers of cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the qEEG response to a cerebral NO donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI). Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit (NICU), John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK Patients: 14 World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4 and 5 patients (mean age 52.8; range 41-69; 11 female). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite 10 mcg/kg/min for one hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous EEG recording for two hours. The ADR was measured before and during intravenous sodium nitrite infusion. Seven out of fourteen patients developed DCI. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in ADR in patients who did not develop DCI (p



Autor: Garry, P - institutionUniversity of Oxford Oxford, MSD, Clinical Neurosciences - - - Rowland, M - institutionUniversity of Oxford

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:f22cb86d-7b84-4854-906e-02a738056932



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