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Reference: Nwokeoha, S, Carlisle, R and Cleveland, Robin, (2016). The Application of Clinical Lithotripter Shock Waves to RNA Nucleotide Delivery to Cells. Ultrasound in medicine & biology.Citable link to this page:

 

The Application of Clinical Lithotripter Shock Waves to RNA Nucleotide Delivery to Cells.

Abstract: The delivery of genes into cells through the transfer of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) has been found to cause a change in the level of target protein expression. RNA-based transfection is conceptually more efficient than commonly delivered plasmid DNA because it does not require division or damage of the nuclear envelope, thereby increasing the chances of the cell remaining viable. Shock waves (SWs) have been found to induce cellular uptake by transiently altering the permeability of the plasma membrane, thereby overcoming a critical step in gene therapy. However, accompanying SW bio-effects include dose-dependent irreversible cell injury and cytotoxicity. Here, the effect of SWs generated by a clinical lithotripter on the viability and permeabilisation of three different cell lines in vitro was investigated. Comparison of RNA stability before and after SW exposure revealed no statistically significant difference. Optimal SW exposure parameters were identified to minimise cell death and maximise permeabilisation, and applied to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) messenger RNA (mRNA) or anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery. As a result, eGFP mRNA expression levels increased up to 52-fold in CT26 cells, whereas a 2-fold decrease in GFP expression was achieved after anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery to MCF-7/GFP cells. These results indicate that SW parameters can be employed to achieve effective nucleotide delivery, laying the foundation for non-invasive and high-tolerability RNA-based gene therapy.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Publisher's versionDate of acceptance:2016-06-02Notes:© 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology Printed in theUSA. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license. Open Access funded by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Elsevier

Publisher Website: http://www.elsevier.com

Journal: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biologysee more from them

Publication Website: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/ultrasound-in-medicine-and-biology/

Issue Date: 2016-07-18Identifiers

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2016.06.001

Issn: 1879-291X

Issn: 0301-5629

Uuid: uuid:ba3b6545-0413-4914-a62c-fe4c5af5e016

Urn: uri:ba3b6545-0413-4914-a62c-fe4c5af5e016

Pubs-id: pubs:636563 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Language: eng

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: Drug delivery Gene therapy High-amplitude acoustic waves Messenger RNA Shock waves Small interfering RNA Ultrasound

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Autor: Nwokeoha, S - fundingRCUK grantNumberEP-G036861-1 Oxford, MPLS, Engineering Science - - - Carlisle, R - fundingEngineering and Ph

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:ba3b6545-0413-4914-a62c-fe4c5af5e016



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