Beyond negative valence: 2-week administration of a serotonergic antidepressant enhances both reward and effort learning signalsReportar como inadecuado




Beyond negative valence: 2-week administration of a serotonergic antidepressant enhances both reward and effort learning signals - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Reference: Scholl, J, Kolling, N, Nelissen, N et al., (2017). Beyond negative valence: 2-week administration of a serotonergic antidepressant enhances both reward and effort learning signals. PLoS Biology, 15 (2), Article: e2000756.Citable link to this page:

 

Beyond negative valence: 2-week administration of a serotonergic antidepressant enhances both reward and effort learning signals

Abstract: To make good decisions, humans need to learn about and integrate different sources of appetitive and aversive information. While serotonin has been linked to value-based decision-making, its role in learning is less clear, with acute manipulations often producing inconsistent results. Here, we show that when the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram) are studied over longer timescales, learning is robustly improved. We measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in volunteers as they performed a concurrent appetitive (money) and aversive (effort) learning task. We found that 2 weeks of citalopram enhanced reward and effort learning signals in a widespread network of brain regions, including ventromedial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. At a behavioral level, this was accompanied by more robust reward learning. This suggests that serotonin can modulate the ability to learn via a mechanism that is independent of stimulus valence. Such effects may partly underlie SSRIs’ impact in treating psychological illnesses. Our results highlight both a specific function in learning for serotonin and the importance of studying its role across longer timescales.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Publisher's versionDate of acceptance:19 January 2017 Funder: Medical Research Council   Funder: Wellcome Trust   Notes:Copyright © 2017 Scholl et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Publisher Website: http://www.plos.org/

Journal: PLoS Biologysee more from them

Publication Website: http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/

Volume: 15

Issue: 2

Extent: Article: e2000756

Issue Date: 2017

pages:Article: e2000756Identifiers

Issn: 1544-9173

Eissn: 1545-7885

Uuid: uuid:3e7022b5-3106-460d-8664-55a4b0d85556

Urn: uri:3e7022b5-3106-460d-8664-55a4b0d85556

Pubs-id: pubs:673062

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2000756 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Version: Publisher's version

Relationships





Autor: Scholl, J - Oxford, MSD, Experimental Psychology Christ Church fundingMedical Research Council grantNumberMR-N014448-1 fundingWel

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:3e7022b5-3106-460d-8664-55a4b0d85556



DESCARGAR PDF




Documentos relacionados