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Reference: Backholer, K, Peters, SAE, Bots, SH et al., (2016). Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 71 (6), 550-557.Citable link to this page:

 

Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract: Background: Low socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but whether its effects are comparable in women and men is unknown.Methods: PubMed MEDLINE was systematically searched. Studies that reported sex-specific estimates, and associated variability, of the relative risk (RR) for coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or CVD according to a marker of SES (education, occupation, income, or area of residence), for both women and men were included. RRs were combined with those derived from cohort studies using individual participant data. Data were pooled using random effects meta-analyses with inverse variance weighting. Estimates of the ratio of the relative risks (RRR), comparing women with men, were computed.Results: Data from 116 cohorts, over 22 million individuals, and over 1 million CVD events, suggest that lower SES is associated with increased risk of CHD, stroke, and CVD in both women and men. For CHD, there was a significantly greater excess risk associated with lower educational attainment in women compared with men; comparing lowest to highest levels, the age-adjusted RRR was 1.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09, 1.41) and the multiple-adjusted RRR was 1.34 (1.09, 1.63). For stroke, the age-adjusted RRR was 0.93 (0.72, 1.18), and the multiple-adjusted was RRR 0.79 (0.53, 1.19). Corresponding results for CVD were 1.18 (1.03, 1.36), 1.23 (1.03, 1.48), respectively. Similar results were observed for other markers of SES for all three outcomes.Conclusion: Reduction of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD and CVD outcomes might require different approaches for men and women.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Accepted ManuscriptDate of acceptance:2016-11-15Notes:© Backholer, et al. Published by BMJ Publishing Group. This is the author accepted manuscript following peer review version of the article. The final version is available from BMJ Publishing Group at: 10.1136/jech-2016-207890.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group

Publisher Website: http://www.bmj.com/company/

Journal: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Healthsee more from them

Publication Website: http://jech.bmj.com/

Volume: 71

Issue: 6

Issue Date: 2016-12-14

pages:550-557Identifiers

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2016-207890

Issn: 0143-005X

Eissn: 1470-2738

Uuid: uuid:832aa173-5d79-4b46-8002-b18ba669cb9f

Urn: uri:832aa173-5d79-4b46-8002-b18ba669cb9f

Pubs-id: pubs:661200 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Language: eng

Version: Accepted ManuscriptKeywords: cardiovascular disease social inequalities meta-analysis coronary heart disease stroke

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Autor: Backholer, K - fundingNational Heart Foundation of Australia grantNumberPH 12M6824 - - - Peters, SAE - Oxford, MSD, Obstetrics an

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:832aa173-5d79-4b46-8002-b18ba669cb9f



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