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Reference: Leneghan, DB, Miura, K, Taylor, IJ et al., (2017). Nanoassembly routes stimulate conflicting antibody quantity and quality for transmission-blocking malaria vaccines. Scientific Reports, 7 (1), 3811.Citable link to this page:

 

Nanoassembly routes stimulate conflicting antibody quantity and quality for transmission-blocking malaria vaccines.

Abstract: Vaccine development efforts have recently focused on enabling strong immune responses to poorly immunogenic antigens, via display on multimerisation scaffolds or virus like particles (VLPs). Typically such studies demonstrate improved antibody titer comparing monomeric and nano-arrayed antigen. There are many such studies and scaffold technologies, but minimal side-by-side evaluation of platforms for both the amount and efficacy of antibodies induced. Here we present direct comparison of three leading platforms displaying the promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV) target Pfs25. These platforms encompass the three important routes to antigen-scaffold linkage: genetic fusion, chemical cross-linking and plug-and-display SpyTag/SpyCatcher conjugation. We demonstrate that chemically-conjugated Qβ VLPs elicited the highest quantity of antibodies, while SpyCatcher-AP205-VLPs elicited the highest quality anti-Pfs25 antibodies for transmission blocking upon mosquito feeding. These quantative and qualitative features will guide future nanoassembly optimisation, as well as the development of the new generation of malaria vaccines targeting transmission.

Publication status:PublishedPeer Review status:Peer reviewedVersion:Publisher's versionDate of acceptance:2017-05-04 Funder: Nuffield Department of Medicine   Funder: Jenner Institute   Funder: St. Catherine’s College, Oxford   Funder: PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative   Funder: National Institutes of Health   Funder: University of Oxford Department of Biochemistry   Notes:© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Bibliographic Details

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

Publisher Website: https://www.nature.com/

Journal: Scientific Reportssee more from them

Publication Website: https://www.nature.com/srep

Volume: 7

Issue: 1

Issue Date: 2017-06

pages:3811Identifiers

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03798-3

Issn: 2045-2322

Uuid: uuid:bf81167a-0d78-42d6-9b16-9fe109031b88

Urn: uri:bf81167a-0d78-42d6-9b16-9fe109031b88

Pubs-id: pubs:702078 Item Description

Type: journal-article;

Language: eng

Version: Publisher's versionKeywords: Journal Article

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Autor: Leneghan, DB - - - Miura, K - - - Taylor, IJ - Oxford, MSD, NDM, Jenner Institute - - - Li, Y - Oxford, MSD, NDM, Jenner Institut

Fuente: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:bf81167a-0d78-42d6-9b16-9fe109031b88



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