Un-rapping the Invisible Man: Black and White Styles in Conflict. A Panel Presentation including The Conventions of Distance the Effects of Schooling on Style by Michael A. Robinson.Reportar como inadecuado




Un-rapping the Invisible Man: Black and White Styles in Conflict. A Panel Presentation including The Conventions of Distance the Effects of Schooling on Style by Michael A. Robinson. - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.





A video tape of a freshman composition student at the University of Arizona shows the difficulty she has faced in writing classes because of her black dialect. Her instructor points out that the student, after some of the readdings in class, recognizes that she has learned code switching on her own to survive in the educational system; this learning to switch codes might have been facilitated by the educational system. Similarly, another instructor in English, on viewing the same video tape, reminisces on his own frustrations as a minority student, yet he notes that issues of style are more complicated than they appear, perhaps more complicated than the taped writing student realizes. Style is not merely the form of the content; rather it is the point of mediation between form and content. When writers study style, they search for principles to unify their acts and interpretations. They study the way ideologies come to life in specific language situations. Style lives at the point where writers translate ideology into, as Kenneth Burke would say, symbolic acts. The two composition instructors together have developed a curriculum that they hope will highlight the culturally bound, conventional aspects of style. Writing curriculums might also be developed that would study various and contrasting discourse communities and communicative context. Kochman's "Black and White Styles in Conflict" could be used to focus on race as a window for studying language. (Includes the course description.) (TB)

Descriptors: Black Dialects, Black Students, Collaborative Writing, Cultural Differences, Freshman Composition, Higher Education, Language Styles, Rhetorical Theory, Undergraduate Students











Autor: Hindman, Jane E.; Robinson, Michael A.

Fuente: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=8785&id=ED376460







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