Working My Way through High School: The Impact of Paid Employment on Transitioning Students with Disabilities. Policy Brief. TransitionsReportar como inadecuado




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Employment and Disability Institute

If the lives of adults with disabilities are any measure of the impact of decades of special education, there are serious problems that must addressed. The employment rate among adults with disabilities, for instance, remains low. If a group of students choose paid employment as a goal for adult life, would not those same students want their educational program to measure the extent to which students actually earn a paycheck? To summarize, one must carefully define both the outcome of "employment" as well as the practice of "career development activities" to establish a pattern of effective practices meaningful to students, their families, educators, employers, agency personnel and policymakers. The state Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) systems and related agencies may appear to provide a solution to this problem of unemployment. At minimum, a close partnership must exist between educational programs and VR agencies at the local level to address this confusion and establish collaborative relationships around individual students and their families. This paper offers a review of research that began in the early 1980s and continues to this day that, demonstrating how this practice leads to higher employment rates for graduates. Nine studies were chosen for this literature review, all of which were quantitative in nature. (Contains 1 table.)

Descriptors: Disabilities, High School Students, High School Graduates, Student Employment, Longitudinal Studies, Educational Research, Intervention, Education Work Relationship, Vocational Rehabilitation, Special Education, Transitional Programs, Vocational Education, Supported Employment

Employment and Disability Institute. ILR School Cornell University 201 Dolgen Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853. Tel: 607-255-7727; Fax: 607-255-2763; e-mail: ilr_edi[at]cornell.edu; Web site: http://www.edi.cornell.edu





Autor: Brewer, David

Fuente: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=4496&id=ED537108







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