The Relationship between EFL Learners Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Their Language Learning Strategy UseReportar como inadecuado




The Relationship between EFL Learners Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Their Language Learning Strategy Use - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.



English Language Teaching, v5 n8 p113-121 2012

The focus of education has changed from teacher-directed to learner-oriented instruction in previous years. Majority of studies in the field of EFL/ESL learning involves issues relevant to learners and their individual differences. Therefore, the present study focused on some of these individual variables; namely self-efficacy and language learning strategies. This study aimed at exploring the relationship between EFL learner's self-efficacy and language learning strategy use. Also, frequently language learning strategies by EFL learners and the existence of a significant difference in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategy use due to gender and years of English study are investigated. A group of 130 first year university students consented to participate in the present study. The results of statistical analyses indicated that there was no relationship between self-efficacy and language learning strategy use. Moreover, metacognitive strategies are frequently used language learning strategies by EFL learners. In addition, there were no significant differences in both self-efficacy and strategy use due to gender. But, there were significant differences in self-efficacy beliefs and only in metacognitive strategies due to years of English study.

Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Second Language Instruction, Second Language Learning, Student Attitudes, Self Efficacy, Learning Strategies, Predictor Variables, Gender Differences, College Freshmen, Statistical Analysis, Correlation, Metacognition, Questionnaires, Rating Scales

Canadian Center of Science and Education. 1120 Finch Avenue West Suite 701-309, Toronto, OH M3J 3H7, Canada. Tel: 416-642-2606; Fax: 416-642-2608; e-mail: elt[at]ccsenet.org; Web site: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/elt





Autor: Bonyadi, Alireza; Nikou, Farahnaz Rimani; Shahbaz, Sima

Fuente: https://eric.ed.gov/?q=a&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_1992&pg=3797&id=EJ1079780







Documentos relacionados