Prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, GhanaReportar como inadecuado




Prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

BMC Psychology

, 4:53

Health psychology

Abstract

BackgroundPrevious research revealed high prevalence of psychological symptoms among sickle cell disease SCD patients in the West and Europe. In some Black SCD populations such as Nigeria and Jamaica, anxiety and depression had low prevalence rates compared to Europe. With difficulty locating research data on the prevalence of psychological symptoms in Ghana, this study aimed at exploring psychological symptoms among adults with SCD in a Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana.

MethodsTwo hundred and one participants males 102 and females 99 who were HbSS n = 131 and HbSC n = 70, aged 18 years and above were purposively recruited. Using the Brief Symptom Inventory BSI in a cross-sectional survey, the research answered questions about the prevalence of psychological symptoms. It also examined gender and genotype differences in psychological symptoms scores.

ResultsResults indicated that adults with SCD had non-distress psychological symptoms scores. Although paranoid ideation as a psychological symptom indicated -a little bit- score, its prevalence was only 1 %. The prevalence of psychological symptoms as indexed by the Positive Symptom Total PST was 10 %. Anxiety, hostility, and depression were psychological symptoms with low scores. Furthermore, except psychoticism scores, males did not differ significantly from females in other psychological symptoms. On the contrary, HbSS participants differed significantly, reporting more psychological symptoms than their HbSC counterparts.

ConclusionsThe study concluded that there was low prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with SCD in this Ghanaian study. Although psychological symptoms distress scores were not observed among study participants at this time, females differed significantly by experiencing more psychoticism symptoms than males. HbSS participants also differed significantly by experiencing more depression, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism, and additional symptoms such as poor appetite, trouble falling asleep, thoughts of dying, and feeling guilty, than their HbSC counterparts. Implications for further study and clinical practice were discussed.

KeywordsPrevalence Psychological symptoms Psychological distress Sickle cell disease Chronic disease Ghana  Download fulltext PDF



Autor: Michael Tetteh Anim - Joseph Osafo - Felix Yirdong

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







Documentos relacionados