Exposure to traffic-related air pollution during physical activity and acute changes in blood pressure, autonomic and micro-vascular function in women: a cross-over studyReportar como inadecuado




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Particle and Fibre Toxicology

, 11:70

First Online: 09 December 2014Received: 26 May 2014Accepted: 24 November 2014

Abstract

BackgroundTraffic-related air pollution may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity. In urban areas, exposures during physical activity are of interest owing to increased breathing rates and close proximity to vehicle emissions.

MethodsWe conducted a cross-over study among 53 healthy non-smoking women in Montreal, Canada during the summer of 2013. Women were exposed to traffic pollutants for 2-hours on three separate occasions during cycling on high and low-traffic routes as well as indoors. Personal air pollution exposures PM2.5, ultrafine particles UFP, black carbon, NO2, and O3 were evaluated along each route and linear mixed-effects models with random subject intercepts were used to estimate the impact of air pollutants on acute changes in blood pressure, heart rate variability, and micro-vascular function in the hours immediately following exposure. Single and multi-pollutant models were examined and potential effect modification by mean regional air pollution concentrations PM2.5, NO2, and O3 was explored for the 24-hour and 5-day periods preceding exposure.

ResultsIn total, 143 exposure routes were completed. Each interquartile increase 10,850-cm in UFP exposure was associated with a 4.91% 95% CI: -9.31 -0.512 decrease in reactive hyperemia index a measure of micro-vascular function and each 24 ppb increase in O3 exposure corresponded to a 2.49% 95% CI: 0.141, 4.84 increase in systolic blood pressure and a 3.26% 95% CI: 0.0117, 6.51 increase in diastolic blood pressure 3-hours after exposure. Personal exposure to PM2.5 was associated with decreases in HRV measures reflecting parasympathetic modulation of the heart and regional PM2.5 concentrations modified these relationships p < 0.05. In particular, stronger inverse associations were observed when regional PM2.5 was higher on the days prior to the study period. Regional PM2.5 also modified the impact of personal O3 on the standard deviation of normal to normal intervals SDNN p < 0.05: a significant inverse relationship was observed when regional PM2.5 was low prior to study periods and a significant positive relationship was observed when regional PM2.5 was high.

ConclusionExposure to traffic pollution may contribute to acute changes in blood pressure, autonomic and micro-vascular function in women. Regional air pollution concentrations may modify the impact of these exposures on autonomic function.

KeywordsEpidemiology Heart rate variability Blood pressure Endothelial function Traffic-Related air pollution AbbreviationsAICAkaike information criterion

BICBayesian information criterion

BMIBody mass index

HFHigh-frequency power

HRVHeart rate variability

IQRInterquartile range

LFLow-frequency power

pNN50Proportion of adjacent NN intervals differing by more than 50 ms

RHIReactive hyperemia index

RMSSDRoot mean square of successive differences in adjacent NN intervals

SDStandard deviation

SDNNStandard deviation of normal to normal intervals

UFPUltrafine particles

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-s12989-014-0070-4 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Autor: Scott Weichenthal - Marianne Hatzopoulou - Mark S Goldberg

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/







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