A fish protein hydrolysate alters fatty acid composition in liver and adipose tissue and increases plasma carnitine levels in a mouse model of chronic inflammationReportar como inadecuado




A fish protein hydrolysate alters fatty acid composition in liver and adipose tissue and increases plasma carnitine levels in a mouse model of chronic inflammation - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Lipids in Health and Disease

, 12:143

First Online: 07 October 2013Received: 31 July 2013Accepted: 24 September 2013

Abstract

BackgroundThere is growing evidence that fish protein hydrolysate FPH diets affect mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism in animals. The aim of the study was to determine if FPH could influence fatty acid metabolism and inflammation in transgene mice expressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha hTNFα.

MethodshTNFα mice C57BL-6 hTNFα were given a high-fat 23%, w-w diet containing 20% casein control group or 15% FPH and 5% casein FPH group for two weeks. After an overnight fast, blood, adipose tissue, and liver samples were collected. Gene expression and enzyme activity was analysed in liver, fatty acid composition was analyzed in liver and ovarian white adipose tissue, and inflammatory parameters, carnitine, and acylcarnitines were analyzed in plasma.

ResultsThe n-3-n-6 fatty acid ratio was higher in mice fed the FPH diet than in mice fed the control diet in both adipose tissue and liver, and the FPH diet affected the gene expression of ∆6 and ∆9 desaturases. Mice fed this diet also demonstrated lower hepatic activity of fatty acid synthase. Concomitantly, a lower plasma INF-γ level was observed. Plasma carnitine and the carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine was higher in the FPH-group compared to control, as was plasma short-chained and medium-chained acylcarnitine esters. The higher level of plasma acetylcarnitine may reflect a stimulated mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, as the hepatic activities of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II were higher in the FPH-fed mice.

ConclusionsThe FPH diet was shown to influence hepatic fatty acid metabolism and fatty acid composition. This indicates that effects on fatty acid metabolism are important for the bioactivity of protein hydrolysates of marine origin.

KeywordsSalmon protein High-fat diet Tumor necrosis factor α Inflammation Carnitine metabolism Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1476-511X-12-143 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Autor: Bodil Bjørndal - Christ Berge - Marie Sannes Ramsvik - Asbjørn Svardal - Pavol Bohov - Jon Skorve - Rolf K Berge

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/



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