Self-assessed mental health problems and work capacity as determinants of return to work: a prospective general population-based study of individuals with all-cause sickness absenceReportar como inadecuado




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BMC Psychiatry

, 13:259

Social psychiatry, therapy and provision of mental health care

Abstract

BackgroundMental health problems are common in the work force and influence work capacity and sickness absence. The aim was to examine self-assessed mental health problems and work capacity as determinants of time until return to work RTW.

MethodsEmployed women and men n=6140, aged 19–64 years, registered as sick with all-cause sickness absence between February 18 and April 15, 2008 received a self-administered questionnaire covering health and work situation response rate 54%. Demographic data was collected from official registers. This follow-up study included 2502 individuals. Of these, 1082 were currently off sick when answering the questionnaire. Register data on total number of benefit compensated sick-leave days in the end of 2008 were used to determine the time until RTW. Self-reported persistent mental illness, the WHO Ten Mental Well-Being Index and self-assessed work capacity in relation to knowledge, mental, collaborative and physical demands at work were used as determinants. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals CI for the likelihood of RTW.

ResultsThe likelihood of RTW ≥105 days was higher among those with persistent mental illness OR= 2.97 95% CI, 2.10-4.20 and those with low mental well-being OR= 2.89 95% CI, 2.31-3.62 after adjusting for gender, age, SES, hours worked and sick leave 2007. An analysis of employees who were off sick when they answered the questionnaire, the likelihood of RTW ≥105 days was higher among those who reported low capacity to work in relation to knowledge, mental, collaborative and physical demands at work. In a multivariable analysis, the likelihood of RTW ≥105 days among those with low mental well-being remained significant OR=1.93 95% CI 1.46-2.55 even after adjustment for all dimensions of capacity to work.

ConclusionSelf-assessed persistent mental illness, low mental well-being and low work capacity increased the likelihood of prolonged RTW. This study is unique because it is based on new sick-leave spells and is the first to show that low mental well-being was a strong determinant of RTW even after adjustment for work capacity. Our findings support the importance of identifying individuals with low mental well-being as a way to promote RTW.

KeywordsSelf-reported mental health problems Self-assessed work capacity Return to work Sickness absence Gunnel Hensing, Monica Bertilsson and Marjan Vaez contributed equally to this work.

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Autor: Gunnel Hensing - Monica Bertilsson - Gunnar AhlborgJr - Margda Waern - Marjan Vaez

Fuente: https://link.springer.com/



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