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FABIÁN M. JAKSIC ;Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 2008, 81 1

Autor: SERGIO A. CASTRO

Fuente: http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=369944285009


Introducción



Revista Chilena de Historia Natural ISSN: 0716-078X editorial@revchilhistnat.com Sociedad de Biología de Chile Chile CASTRO, SERGIO A.; JAKSIC, FABIÁN M. Patterns of turnover and floristic similarity show a non-random distribution of naturalized flora in Chile, South America Revista Chilena de Historia Natural, vol.
81, núm.
1, 2008, pp.
111-121 Sociedad de Biología de Chile Santiago, Chile Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=369944285009 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative Revista Chilena de Historia Natural NON-RANDOM DISTRIBUTION OF NATURALIZED FLORA IN CHILE 111 81: 111-121, 2008 Patterns of turnover and floristic similarity show a non-random distribution of naturalized flora in Chile, South America Patrones de recambio y similitud florística muestran una distribución no aleatoria de la flora naturalizada en Chile, Sudamérica SERGIO A.
CASTRO1,3* & FABIÁN M.
JAKSIC 2,3 1 Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Química y Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Chile Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile 3 Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology & Biodiversity (CASEB), Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, CP 6513677, Santiago, Chile *e-mail for correspondence: scastro@usach.cl 2 ABSTRACT The current geographical distribution of alien species could be informative of processes involved in the biological invasions facilitated by humans.
Because environmental and anthropic factors affect the geographic distribution of alien plants, we hypothesize that naturalized plants have a non-random distribution along extensive geographical ranges.
On the basis of a complete and updated database of naturalized plants in Chile, we analyz...





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