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Abstract: Since the publication of Robert K. Merton-s theory of cumulative advantage inscience Matthew Effect, several empirical studies have tried to measure itspresence at the level of papers, individual researchers, institutions orcountries. However, these studies seldom control for the intrinsic -quality- ofpapers or of researchers-better- however defined papers or researcherscould receive higher citation rates because they are indeed of better quality.Using an original method for controlling the intrinsic value ofpapers-identical duplicate papers published in different journals withdifferent impact factors-this paper shows that the journal in which papers arepublished have a strong influence on their citation rates, as duplicate paperspublished in high impact journals obtain, on average, twice as much citationsas their identical counterparts published in journals with lower impactfactors. The intrinsic value of a paper is thus not the only reason a givenpaper gets cited or not; there is a specific Matthew effect attached tojournals and this gives to paper published there an added value over and abovetheir intrinsic quality.



Author: Vincent Lariviere, Yves Gingras

Source: https://arxiv.org/







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