Parental and household smoking and the increased risk of bronchitis, bronchiolitis and other lower respiratory infections in infancy: systematic review and meta-analysisReport as inadecuate




Parental and household smoking and the increased risk of bronchitis, bronchiolitis and other lower respiratory infections in infancy: systematic review and meta-analysis - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Respiratory Research

, 12:5

First Online: 01 December 2011Received: 13 October 2010Accepted: 10 January 2011

Abstract

BackgroundPassive smoke exposure increases the risk of lower respiratory infection LRI in infants, but the extensive literature on this association has not been systematically reviewed for nearly ten years. The aim of this paper is to provide an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of the association between passive smoking and LRI, and with diagnostic subcategories including bronchiolitis, in infants aged two years and under.

MethodsWe searched MEDLINE and EMBASE to November 2010, reference lists from publications and abstracts from major conference proceedings to identify all relevant publications. Random effect pooled odds ratios OR with 95% confidence intervals CI were estimated.

ResultsWe identified 60 studies suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Smoking by either parent or other household members significantly increased the risk of LRI; odds ratios OR were 1.22 95% CI 1.10 to 1.35 for paternal smoking, 1.62 95% CI 1.38 to 1.89 if both parents smoked, and 1.54 95% CI 1.40 to 1.69 for any household member smoking. Pre-natal maternal smoking OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.38 had a weaker effect than post-natal smoking OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.45 to 1.73. The strongest effect was on bronchiolitis, where the risk of any household smoking was increased by an OR of 2.51 95% CI 1.96 to 3.21.

ConclusionsPassive smoking in the family home is a major influence on the risk of LRI in infants, and especially on bronchiolitis. Risk is particularly strong in relation to post-natal maternal smoking. Strategies to prevent passive smoke exposure in young children are an urgent public and child health priority.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1465-9921-12-5 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Laura L Jones - Ahmed Hashim - Tricia McKeever - Derek G Cook - John Britton - Jo Leonardi-Bee

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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