Capítulo 2. Literature Review- Using Second Language Acquisition Theories to select technology tools for the Language Classroom - Departamento de Lenguas.Report as inadecuate




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Capítulo 2. Literature Review- Using Second Language Acquisition Theories to select technology tools for the Language Classroom - Departamento de Lenguas. - Licenciatura en Idiomas. - Escuela de Artes y Humanidades - Universidad de las Américas Puebla.

Author: Aguilar Ramírez, Mariana

Source: http://catarina.udlap.mx/


Teaser



SLA and technology Chapter 2: literature review 2.1 Second language acquisition theories For decades, the learning and teaching of a foreign language has constantly been studied to keep up with the changes occurring in that particular time.
Many theories and principles have been proposed, some remain valid nowadays, and others have been discarded.
These theoretical foundations provide the necessary framework to carry out new research, to replicate it and to make decisions on what has already been said and done.
This is exactly what SLA theories, hypothesis and principles will do in this thesis; they will offer guidance for the integration of technology in a language classroom. 2.1.1 The role of interaction. Human learning is mediated through interaction with others; in interactions with parents, peers, friends, teachers, etc., students move into phases of thinking and speaking that they would not be able to go to alone (Vygostky, 1934-1962 as cited in Kreeft Peyton, 1999).
In the mid 70’s, Wagner- Gough and Hatch were among the first second language researchers that began to consider the role conversation plays in the development of a foreign language in a students’ brain because oral interactions in authentic situations are crucial to language development (Wagner- Gough and Hatch, 1975).
They showed how a learner participating in a conversation provides them with valuable opportunities to hear and produce the second or foreign language in ways that go beyond the mere practice of material that has been studied previously.
Long (1996) uses interaction hypothesis to express that conversational interaction is the basis of language development; in other words, conversations are more than means to practice language, but a way in which learning takes place. The interaction hypothesis is the negotiation of meaning, and especially negotiation work that triggers interactional adjustments by the native speaker (NS) or more competent interlocutor, facilitates acquisition b...






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